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Blog > Kevin's Corner > Colts Coverage > Meet New Colts Offensive Coordinator Nick Sirianni

Meet New Colts Offensive Coordinator Nick Sirianni

The new offensive coordinator for the Indianapolis Colts is 36-year-old Nick Sirianni, who comes to Indy after 5 seasons with the Chargers.

Bob Levy | Getty Images


INDIANAPOLIS – While the familiarity isn’t there with his defensive coordinator, Frank Reich does have some history with his new offensive coordinator.

Nick Sirianni, 36, will become a first-time offensive coordinator as he joins Reich’s staff in Indianapolis.

Sirianni worked with Reich for 3 years with the Chargers (2013-15).

"I've been around this game a long time, and been around a lot of great offensive minds, Nick is among the top offensive minds I've ever been around." Reich said to Colts.com. "This guy is a stud. He's incredibly fast-minded. He's great in the pass game. He knows the run game very well. He's dynamic on the field with players. He's a great teacher. He's got a lot of charisma. He's a grinder, hard worker. This is a guy I have complete confidence and trust in."

In 2014-15, Sirianni took over the quarterback coaching reigns from Reich, as the now Colts head coach was elevated to offensive coordinator in San Diego.

With the Chargers for the last 5 years, Sirianni has been a QB coach and most recently was the wideouts coach for the last 2 years.

When Reich and Sirianni teamed together as the OC and QB coach respectively, Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers had 2 solid seasons.

Rivers actually threw for a career-high in completions (437), attempts (661) and yards (4,792) in 2015, which was Sirianni’s last season as Rivers’ position coach.

Sirianni survived the 2016 firing of San Diego coach Mike McCoy. When Anthony Lynn took over for the Chargers move to Los Angeles last year, Sirianni was retained as the team’s wideouts coach.

In 2 years as the receivers coach, undrafted wideout Tyrell Williams had a breakout season of 1,059 yards. Then this past season, Keenan Allen returned from a torn ACL to finish 3rd in the NFL with 1,393 receiving yards.

Williams has been outspoken in his praise for how Sirianni coached him.

“I think he’s been one of the main reasons why I’ve been able to have success this year,” Williams said in 2016. “Working with him through OTAs and all of the (spring), we worked on a lot of detail, how to get in and out of breaks. He’s been a huge help.”

From coaching the quarterbacks and then the wideouts, Chargers’ players noticed a little fierier Sirianni.

More from this article by Michael Gehlken details Sirianni’s change in his coaching style.

He screams. Often.

This is a style adjustment Sirianni made in 2016 after spending the previous two seasons as the Chargers’ quarterbacks coach. Naturally, he took a quieter approach when working with Rivers and veteran Kellen Clemens. To hear the quarterbacks and wide receivers on the roster portray Sirianni’s approach is to hear them describe two seemingly different coaches.

But while the broadcast volume varies, Sirianni has been consistent in his program.

He loves and knows the game.

He thrives on its details.

He wants the best for his players.

“You coach quarterbacks differently from how you coach wide receivers,” Clemens said. “What’s been cool to see is how he can change based on who he’s coaching from a positional group but also as individuals. He’s really, really smart. But he also doesn’t have an ego where you can’t present different ideas. One of the signs of a great coach is being able to listen, and he listens. More often than not, he’s right, but he still listens.

“He’s a guy who should get a shot to continue to move up the ladder in this league. … He’s a guy who should be calling plays someday and hopefully have an opportunity to be a head coach.”

Before Sirianni’s time with the Chargers, he was in Kansas City for the 4 years preceding Chris Ballard’s arrival in 2013.

Sirianni played collegiately at Division III power Mount Union---the school that produced former Colts’ wideout Pierre Garcon.

With the hiring of Sirianni, the Colts will have a pair of first-time coordinators and a first-time head coach in 2018.

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